Rod Blocker Jr. (Brotherly Differences on YouTube)

Rod Blocker Jr. is the co-host of Brotherly Differences, a YouTube channel he and his brother started that chronicles current events in both sports and pop culture.

Blocker thoroughly enjoys hosting the weekly episodes from the comforts of his home, but the Chicago native has also received a considerable amount of pushback from those in his community who don’t always agree with his perspectives.

This is particularly evident whenever Blocker reveals his politically incorrect beliefs, especially the ones that pertain to the modern dating culture.

Blocker says he has learned to accept the criticism that comes with being an active voice on such a controversial subject, but insists that he will remain steadfast in his approach to disseminating the realities of modern dating, even if his sentiments bother a select percentage of his audience.

That being said, Blocker does not consider himself a provocateur, which is why he will readily acknowledge the outside forces currently plaguing young singles, such as dating apps.

“The dating apps are weird,” Blocker says.

“Tinder and POF (Plenty of Fish) have always seemed strange, but when I got to college, I learned that a lot of people used those apps, to the point where it was starting to become the norm.”

Even though technological advances have made interacting with the opposite gender easier for a wide array of people, Blocker thinks the innovations have also brought on unforeseen challenges that many young people are struggling to adapt to.  

“You don’t get to know a person when you are on these apps. It’s all trial and error, and everything is so immediate,” he says.

Potentially more damaging is the fact that through these online interactions people are not learning how to communicate with prospective partners in a healthy and respectful manner.

“Back in our parents’ day, they actually took the time to get to know each other and build a relationship, and often people would form friendships through work or school before they went on a date,” Blocker explains.

“But now we are relegated to swiping.”

It is difficult to say if modern dating is worse than it was in previous generations, but one thing is undeniably certain:

Everyone can date, regardless of socioeconomic status, physical fitness, or personal circumstances.

“Dating today is more accessible. Anyone with a smartphone can put themselves out there. Compare that to back in the day, and people had to be out on the scene in order to meet people, or you had to have a little bit of money in order to be noticed,” Blocker says.

None of Blocker’s aforementioned viewpoints have drawn intense criticism, but much like esteemed Youtuber Kevin Samuels, Blocker receives the most hate whenever he discusses the role modern women play in the current dating market.

More specifically, Blocker has found that women don’t like when he asserts that the modern woman is different from her predecessors, even though he cites a few reasons for how he came to that conclusion.

“I don’t think there’s any doubt that women today are more independent than they used to be,” Blocker asserts.

“A lot of women bring their own things to the table, especially in terms of financial security. I know a lot of women who take care of themselves and make their own money, but at the same time they also are looking for men who will take care of them.”

Therein lies the disconnect that Blocker has been chastised for acknowledging: the financially independent modern woman seeking a man who also offers stability and security.

“In past generations, women were more reliant upon men. They did not work as much and they were not as committed to their careers. They were more interested in being stay-at-home-moms and that worked because they were okay with depending on the man to provide for the family,” Blocker notes.

Blocker admits that there is nothing inherently wrong with women being financially independent, but mentions that just like with dating apps, there are unexpected drawbacks that come with changes to the social ecosystem.

“Now a lot of women need to see that a man is doing better than them in order for them to commit to something long-term,” Blocker says, adding that this mentality did not exist in his parents’ heyday, back when despite a national GDP that was seven times lower than it is today, people were still excited about the prospect of getting married.

“My dad was a great example of this. He didn’t have a great job, but my mom loved him like he was worth six figures.”

Blocker then points out that while the number of women in the workforce has rapidly increased over the years, the way men view women has remained relatively the same.

“If you look at the way men are, we aren’t much different than what we’ve always been. People can say that we haven’t evolved to the same extent as modern women, but the reality is that our expectations simply have not changed, and that’s also in terms of what we seek from the opposite sex,” Blocker explains.

But perhaps the same cannot be said for women, many of whom Blocker says are no longer interested in partnering with a man who does not have significant resources.

“Women today want things to materialize quicker, and they want those things to happen according to their timeline,” Blocker says.

Many of these sentiments have been propagated by the aforementioned Kevin Samuels, a man who has accumulated not only over one million subscribers on YouTube, but also a considerable amount of backlash for the way he communicates with the various women who come on his show.

One could argue that because of their shared perspectives, Blocker is a Kevin Samuels disciple, but Blocker also is quick to mention that Kevin Samuels, despite what many think, is not shy about taking men to task for their own shortcomings.

“Kevin Samuels does a really good job of holding men accountable. A lot of people think he just goes after women, but if you look at the way he interacts with men, he is just as harsh and just as critical,” Blocker explains.

It should then come as no surprise that Blocker routinely goes in on men during his broadcasts, something he says is not only fair, but also is integral toward creating a balanced society where blame is not thrust solely upon men or women.

“My mom taught me this: if a woman really values a man, then she will become an extension of him,” Blocker shares.

So yes, while I do agree with Kevin Samuels when he says that a lot of women don’t know their place, men have to set the proper tone for the relationship and give women something to believe in and follow.”

Blocker predicts that once both genders assume a proper amount of responsibility, both the individuals involved and society will benefit.

“Having these conversations isn’t about control because everyone involved is an adult, but it is about two people choosing each other and collectively agreeing on the roles that they each need to fulfill in order for the relationship to be successful,” Blocker says.

Still, attaining this arguably utopian dynamic remains incredibly challenging.

As seen in the case of Kevin Samuels, even though Samuels is striving to produce a more harmonious society, the reality is that there is a large percentage of the population who vehemently disagree with his tactics and instead resort to lambasting the revered public figure.

While attempting to dismantle Kevin Samuels’ platform would appear to be disastrous for all parties involved, Blocker believes that he has found the answer to why so many people want to see Samuels removed from YouTube.

“There is no general consensus when it comes to Kevin Samuels. It is a 50-50 split, and a lot of the pushback has to do with the fact that Kevin Samuels uses statistics to hold people accountable,” Blocker says.

“Unfortunately, in this generation, when you hold people accountable, they get offended.”

That alone is one major reason why Blocker is concerned about the future of dating and society’s long-held belief in marriage.

“It’s sad because there are things that need to be called out in relationships. Actually, there are things that need to be called out regarding both sexes, but nowadays if these things are discussed in a public forum someone is going to get offended and try to misrepresent what you’re saying,” he says.

There have already been numerous attacks on Kevin Samuels’ platform by those wishing to silence his message, and while Blocker does not possess the same type of clout as Samuels, he understands that soon more people may take aim at what he’s trying to do.

Yet, Blocker is not worried about what the future may have in store for him.

A teacher by day, Blocker is committed to leveraging his platform in order to better serve his community.

He says what motivates him every day is seeing firsthand just how eager the impressionable youth are for guidance, and that consequently he feels responsible for ensuring they get the best possible outcomes.

“My definition of success is making these kids aware of some of the things that I wish I knew when I was in their position,” Blocker says, which perhaps helps explain why the man who has already reached so many isn’t in a hurry to see his brand explode across the internet.

“I always tell people, if you focus on helping other people and doing the right things, you will grow exponentially. Beyond that, everything else will take care of itself.” QS

**

To learn more about Rod Blocker Jr., check out his YouTube channel!

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